Courtesy Dvele

At Karoleena Homes in British Columbia, brothers Kurt and Kris Goodjohn were known for offering well-designed, high-end modular homes since the company’s establishment in 2013. After selling that company in mid-2016 to publicly traded Canadian holding company Horizon North, the pair have emerged again in the prefabricated sphere with a newly established U.S. company.

The brothers realized after the sale they weren’t ready to exit modular construction. Last year, they brought their modular expertise to California to continue developing luxury, factory-built homes under a new brand: Dvele.

The duo recruited third-generation U.S. home builder Brandon Weiss, founder of Evolutionary Home Builders in Chicago, to join them as the company’s chief innovation officer. In that role, he focuses on the home’s health and wellness aspects, along with longevity, resiliency, and energy efficiency.

On the technology end, Dvele's president and chief revenue officer Greg Welch has expertise in launching more than 10 start-ups and will lead the company's growth strategy.

Although the team explored contracting with local factories, they instead acquired a prefab home factory outside of San Bernardino, Calif., to build its homes. The president, Luca Brammer, joined the team as chief operating officer.

“Our team is really unique in the modular/prefab space in that we bring people from all different elements,” says Weiss. “Unlike newer modular companies, we have site-built experience, prefab/modular experience, and technology experience between our executive team.”

Dvele offers eight standard models in one-story and two-story options, ranging from 1,139 to 3,956 square feet. Four miniature units are also available at 430 square feet. Luxury options include floor-to-ceiling windows, antimicrobial surfaces, high-end appliances, and custom millwork.

Standard features focus on technology and the health of its inhabitants. From mesh WiFi networks and remote home access to solar roofs and sustainable materials, Dvele homes go beyond their modern looks. All house systems are electric-powered and combustion-free, which neutralizes carbon monoxide risk, and state-of-the-art ventilation provides even distribution of filtered air throughout the home.

Pricing for the homes ranges from $200 to $275 per square foot not including land costs and site work. Dvele can guarantee the price point for the factory-built units, in addition to the delivery time, because 90% of each home is built at the factory and shipped to the sites.

Due to the company’s California location, Dvele is currently focused on rebuilding homes that were affected by recent wildfires. While site builders are offering year-long timelines for rebuilding, the prefab company says it could get clients back into a home in less than six months.

Courtesy Dvele

In addition to its California projects, the builder has constructed 25 homes this year in locations ranging from Colorado to Arizona.

“We are looking for the right clients across the country and marketing in several different territories,” says Weiss. “Although a major focus is on the West Coast, we are looking to scale as a nationwide company and take on strategic projects that will help us with our future goals.”