Asphalt

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Readers Choice: Certainteed Solaris

Stay cool with solar-reflective asphalt shingles. More

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Inflation May Cause Construction Material Prices to Creep Upward

One analysis expects global demand to affect some products more than others in 2011. More

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Warmup Inc. Snow Melt Mat Warmup Inc. Snow Melt Mat

These mats prevents snow and ice from forming on driveways. More

Pros and Cons: Asphalt Shingles vs. Metal Roofing
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Pros and Cons: Asphalt Shingles vs. Metal Roofing

Asphalt dominates, but which material is right for your homes? More

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Rising Commodities Prices One More Cross for Besieged Builders to Bear Rising Commodities Prices One More Cross for Besieged Builders to Bear

Building material prices have skyrocketed, and builders are bearing the brunt of the increases. More

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Metal Roofing and Skylight product information

There is a house in Omaha, Neb., that is unlike any other house in the state—perhaps the ountry. Built under HUD's Partnership for Advancing Technology in Housing (PATH), this “concept” house is loaded with 60 of the best technologies and products home building has to offer and is seen as a model for the future of home construction. The roof the agency chose to use on the house is made from metal. More

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Shingle Saver

A landfill owner has earned high environ-market for asphalt “tear off” shingles. These shingles are rarely recycled because they contain many contaminants. But Dale Behnen of Peerless Landfill, near Valley Park, Mo., has found a mix that works for highway road material and should cost less than “clean” asphalt. The company is awaiting approval for the material from the Missouri Department of Transportation. More

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Price Hurdles

WHEN BUILDER REPORTED ON SKYROCKETING plywood and OSB prices in November 2003, the pundits urged calm. They predicted that wood prices would level off by January 2004, and they were right. More

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CLEANUP STATS

The dismantling of the Orlando, Fla., Naval Training Center was one of the largest demolition projects in the country. A total of 4.5 million square feet was bulldozed, including 256 buildings, 200 miles of underground utilities, and 40 miles of asphalt roads. About 600,000 tons of clean concrete and masonry materials were crushed and recycled into Baldwin Park's roadbeds and drainage filtration system (on-site recycling saved an estimated 25,000 dump-truck trips through local neighborhoods). New infrastructure totaling $85 million was put in place after demolition. More

Asphalt Shingles Get a Face-Lift
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Asphalt Shingles Get a Face-Lift

By Nigel F. Maynard. "There has clearly been a shift in consumer preference from... More

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