Musicians know that adagio means to play music at a slow, leisurely pace. Well, that's the concept behind Crestron Electronics' Adagio program, which looks to start home buyers off with an affordable distributed audio system and then add networked Crestron products as the home buyer sees fit.

Crestron's program is important to the home builder market for at least two reasons.

First, a base audio system that covers six rooms and comes with keypads, AM/FM and XM tuners, and built-in networked home control now costs about $2,900. Conversely, an entry-level Crestron system used to run around $10,000—and cost in excess of $70,000 once the home buyer was done adding on to it.

Second, Crestron's Adagio program speaks to the idea of building a relationship with customers. Salespeople in the home-tech world complain that it's been very difficult to get home builders to consider upselling buyers six months to a year after they've moved into their home.

There's been a lot of talk and not much action—until Crestron's new program, which was introduced at the CEDIA home electronics trade show last fall. The core system gives home buyers a clear upgrade path that they can take weeks, months, or years to follow. Buyers can add lighting control with Crestron's ZigBee-based wireless in-fiNET switches for $250 a switch, as well as an iPod docking station for about $700. Crestron can even start adding in HVAC control for about $500 per zone.

Crestron started shipping Adagio in earnest during the first quarter of this year. Visit www.crestron.com for more information.

AUDIO SAVVY: Home buyers who opt for Crestron's Adagio audio system can add an iPod docking station for about $700.
AUDIO SAVVY: Home buyers who opt for Crestron's Adagio audio system can add an iPod docking station for about $700.