We observed large air bubbles under the membrane, as well as areas missing counterflashing.
We observed large air bubbles under the membrane, as well as areas missing counterflashing.

In this article, JLC writer Chris Ermides details his work as site supervisor for a well-built house with a serious water problem. He worked for days to trace the source of the leak on the home in upstate New York that was under construction during one of the area's worst winters ever.

Despite the rough weather, Ermides says the workmanship was some of the best he had ever seen. The framers had already gone above and beyond their scope by flashing the SIPs with Grip-Rite ShingleLayment. But where the Zip wall sheathing met the SIP panels (an area that would eventually be covered by the roof overhang) proved to be a weak spot at this stage of the construction.

While I was temporarily spot flashing, I discovered an area in the basement that had puddled. The architect and I at first assumed water had migrated inside through the leaks between the Zip wall and the SIPs. But we grew puzzled when we couldn’t trace its path. Hopefully, once the roof assembly overbuild was in place and the exterior fully flashed, we surmised, the water we saw in the basement would disappear. Unfortunately, that did not happen. Even after days of sun and warmer temperatures, water continued to appear in the basement.

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