1. Protect the Wall Before framing the roof eave, place a continuous housewrap drainage material against the wall sheathing.

2. Integrate the Flashing The kickout flashing should be installed to lap over the roof membrane and drip edge at the eave, but lap under the step flashing going up the roof-to-wall joint.

3. Seal the Corner A piece of self-adhering flashing at the corner where the subfascia meets the wall provides additional protection for siding and housewrap.
Pete Sucheski 1. Protect the Wall Before framing the roof eave, place a continuous housewrap drainage material against the wall sheathing. 2. Integrate the Flashing The kickout flashing should be installed to lap over the roof membrane and drip edge at the eave, but lap under the step flashing going up the roof-to-wall joint. 3. Seal the Corner A piece of self-adhering flashing at the corner where the subfascia meets the wall provides additional protection for siding and housewrap.


Kickout Flashing Where roof eaves abut walls, there’s a risk that rain and melting snow running down the roof will penetrate the wall. That’s where you need a kickout flashing that directs roof runoff away from the wall and into the gutter.

1. Protect the Wall Before framing the roof eave, place a continuous housewrap drainage material against the wall sheathing.
2. Integrate the Flashing The kickout flashing should be installed to lap over the roof membrane and drip edge at the eave, but lap under the step flashing going up the roof-to-wall joint.
3. Seal the Corner A piece of self-adhering flashing at the corner where the subfascia meets the wall provides additional protection for siding and housewrap.