Right Down the Line

Goodman House is in a dense residential neighborhood in Venice, Calif.

The infill site was a long, narrow lot, so the designed warranted linearity.

Modern materials were used, but with warm touches.

The home had to accommodate the owners’ collection of art and furniture, accumulated over years of traveling.

Just beyond the entry is the kitchen, which opens onto the living room.

In addition to an eclectic collection of art and furniture, space was needed for the owner’s books. The living room floor looks like a rug, but it’s a smooth pebble aggregate that feels great on the feet. The room opens onto the front courtyard on one side.In addition to an eclectic collection of art and furniture, space was needed for the owner’s books. The living room floor looks like a rug, but it’s a smooth pebble aggregate that feels great on the feet. The room opens onto the front courtyard on one side.

The media room and home office is long and narrow, but it’s filled with light. Cabinetry underscores the linear plan.

Bolts on the stair stand out as modern accents, a contrast to the soapstone and wood cabinetry in the media room.

The neutral palette extends to the upstairs hallway.

The owner wanted color in her house but didn’t want to push against the neutral palette of the architectural materials. Her great solution: color inside the laundry room and closet doors.

The bathroom floor uses the same pebble aggregate as in the living room. Floors have radiant heat.

Trespa, a high-pressure laminate, is used on both courtyard walls and interior walls. Like the sliding window walls, it blurs the inside-outside line.

A long, narrow lot could have been a big headache, but architects Trevor Abramson and Douglas Teiger turned it into an advantage, embracing the linearity.

Crisp yet playful, the home’s north-facing façade is a shadowplay of rectangles in recess and relief.

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