Almost Off-the-Grid

ECOHOME 2010 EcoHome Design Awards Grand Award High transoms along the roofline heighten the indoor-outdoor connection and frame distant views.

On this sunny bluff overlooking Cape Cod Bay, 11.7kW of solar panels on the south-facing roof gather much of the home's required energy.

Inspired by the slope of the dunes, the home's rooflines fit elegantly into the site and soar upward to capture distant ocean vistas.

Sloped ceilings soar up toward ocean vistas and lower down into more personal interior spaces.

Heat gain from west-facing windows was countered by a tighter, well-insulated building envelope and thoughtfully zoned HVAC.

View from foyer looking across the open kitchen into the dining room.

The entry way opens up to both living and sleeping sections of the flexible floor plan as well as offering immediate access to the beaches beyond.

An expansive deck rests steps above grade obviating the need for view-blocking railings.

Energy Diagram

Floor plan diagram showing how the house can be closed off or opened up depending on the number of occupants.

Site plan

Inside, steel I-beams stand in for exposed timbers.

A respectful reinterpretation of New England farmhouse vernacular, this vacation compound uses a woodshedlike covered walkway to link the main house and a garage/guest apartment.

CUSTOM HOME March-April 2009 On Site Structural Integrity Native grasses, which require little or no watering, naturally go dormant during Northern California's annual dry season.

Clean geometry and an abbreviated finish schedule yield interiors that are relaxingly simple. The dining area centers on a table whose top is a single slab of reclaimed redwood.

Translucent canopies link the building's three pavilions.

Glazing in the main living pavilion is oriented for solar gain and views of the surrounding Madrone forest.

A short uphill hike brings one to the pool pavilion and a shallow lap pool heated entirely with solar collectors.

Residential Architect March 2006 K B Studio / Kitchen Main Course The kitchen is the command center for all public spaces within the home. "From the kitchen you can communicate with people in all of the nearby rooms and see out to all of the exterior spaces," Burke says.

Glass walls on the exterior and a lack of walls inside let the 1,500-square-foot house live large. Outdoor terraces and porches nearly double the home’s total square footage.

Residential Architect June 2007 In the Middle of Nowhere Alongside the unpaved road to Lori Ryker and Brett W. Nave's home and studio, alpacas and horses nibble placidly at the surrounding grassland. Dusty pickup trucks drive well under the posted speed limit of 35 miles per hour. The Livingston, Mont., compound is so remote, its exact street address doesn't show up on MapQuest.

Alongside the unpaved road to Lori Ryker and Brett W. Nave's home and studio, alpacas and horses nibble placidly at the surrounding grassland. Dusty pickup trucks drive well under the posted speed limit of 35 miles per hour. The Livingston, Mont., compound is so remote, its exact street address doesn't show up on MapQuest.

Residential Architect July-August 2011 Green Piece Mountain Solo An energy-efficient, low-maintenance building shell and both passive and active solar energy systems yield a building that can fend for itself in a remote location subject to extreme weather.

Interior materials include a variety of salvaged woods and sprayed earth plaster.

The knotty pine ceiling is the inside face of the SIPs that form the roof.

Residential Architect March 2005 Natural Habitat The straw bale Johnson residence in the Sierra Nevada Mountains is virtually free of the power grid. Upturned roofs collect sunlight and offer views of Job’s Peak.

Photovoltaic panels generate electricity, and solar thermal panels combined with radiant sand beds beneath concrete slabs provide heat and hot water.

The fireplace is shaped with sprayed earth.

Inside the Johnson house, salvaged fir slats echo the exterior siding, and glass panels on the floor transmit light to a hallway below.

The “truth” window.

The old exterior cladding reappears as wainscoting in the new building, and the old doors are boiut into a frame that folds open like a Shoji screen, merging the main space with the screened porch.

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