Michael Woodley

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Design musts for a choppy 2014 recovery…

Commentary from senior executives of the bellwether public home builders confirms one thing. Whether it’s accurate or not to call 2013’s latter-half slowdown a “pause” or something else, it’s clear that what's changed is this: Not everything is working, and some things are working very well. That’s called “lumpy.” So, our focus on five production home builder design mega-trends that will be helpful for 2014 is on those that will materially impact your results in the next 12 months. We got help here from Michael Woodley, whose eponymous firm is headquartered in the Denver area, and from Manny Gonzalez and his mates at KTGY, both firms who do a great deal of work with production home builders. More

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Builder's 2012 Concept Homes: Gen B Builder's 2012 Concept Homes: Gen B

For empty-nesters, it’s about scaling down and having fun, with room for kids, grandkids, and friends to visit on holidays and weekends. More

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Builder's 2012 Concept Homes Builder's 2012 Concept Homes

Learn Your XYB's: Builder's 2012 Concept Homes are a lesson in knowing what your buyers want and how to deliver it. More

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Builder's 2012 Concept Homes - Gen X Builder's 2012 Concept Homes - Gen X

For a hard-working professional couple with active kids and a live-in relative, here's the ticket: a home that multitasks as hard as its owners do. More

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Builder's 2012 Concept Homes: Gen Y Builder's 2012 Concept Homes: Gen Y

A young couple starting out needs room for a growing family, plus space for visiting friends and relatives. More

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Go Beyond Square Footage to Sell Smaller Homes

Designers Sarah Susanka and Michael Woodley share their thoughts about perception and reality at the Housing Leadership Summit. More

Mining for Gold
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Mining for Gold

Eureka! fits because the exuberant, 6,300-square-foot house, designed by the... More

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The Shrinking Lot

Small-lot configurations have been around for many years, but today builders are using them more often. The challenge is not so much finding buyers who are willing to live on less land; plenty of people like the low-maintenance lifestyle it offers or are happy to sacrifice lot size for location. Rather, it's manipulating space to create new products that appeal to buyers, the neighbors, and the jurisdictions. "Our goal as architects is to make people not realize the lot has shrunk by carefully planning the house so the outdoor space is seamless," says architect Michael Woodley, of Woodley Architectural Group in Denver. More

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