In this May 28, 2013 photo provided by Agriburbia LLB, workers prepare new growing beds at Table Mountain Farm near Golden, Colo. When mature, the flowers and edibles will be sold directly from the field for processing or to be eaten raw by people who live nearby. (Matthew Redmond for Agriburbia LLB via AP)
Matthew Redmond In this May 28, 2013 photo provided by Agriburbia LLB, workers prepare new growing beds at Table Mountain Farm near Golden, Colo. When mature, the flowers and edibles will be sold directly from the field for processing or to be eaten raw by people who live nearby. (Matthew Redmond for Agriburbia LLB via AP)

Neighborhoods have often centered around golf courses, town centers, or community pools. But according to a post by Dean Fosdick in the Aurora Sentinel, some communities are now being built around functional farms focused on healthier food for all. These farm-to-table style communities offer a space for residents to grow food and reap the benefits of fresh crops for dinner.

Agrihoods can manifest themselves in a number of ways. Some include land that is rented out to farmers, some have non-profit community-supported agriculture, and some are run entirely by the residents.

A lot of things are driving the trend, said Ed McMahon, senior resident fellow with the Urban Land Institute in Washington. “There’s more interest in fresh foods. There’s interest in good health. There’s interest in local everything. It’s also about enjoying the many conveniences that help you meet your neighbors.” Many purchasers are second-home buyers, retirees or parents of young children, McMahon said.

“They tend to be what I call the ‘barbell generation,'” he said. “The millennial generation that wants fresh everything, that wants to know where their food is coming from. Also the senior generation, the baby boomers. They don’t want big yards to take care of anymore.”

Home prices also tend to be a lot cheaper for agriculture developments than those that face golf courses, and are more environmentally friendly (think about the water-shortage concerns that could arise when maintaining the green). Many activists are even pushing to have golf course communities concerted into farming neighborhoods.

For more about these "Agrihoods" cropping up around the country, check out BUILDER's Six Farm-Centric Developments That Put a Fresh Spin on Land Planning.

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