Photo courtesy Evan Jackson
Photo courtesy Evan Jackson

A study by job-research site Indeed revealed that in the past 10 years, only about 15% of the working-age population held a job that had salary growth and also matched the high-water mark for household income. Wall Street Journal staffer Jeffrey Sparshot takes a look at the study for which Indeed focused on the annual average wage of at least $57,000.

The labor market is today seeing more jobs and the wages are expected to pick up but the reason behind this low percentage maybe that some have fallen out of the labor force due to a lack of well-paying, low-skill jobs:

But across the labor market there is also evidence of a widening gap between workers with at least a four-year college degree and those with less. The disappearance of many low-skilled but good-paying jobs appears to be exacerbating the situation and pushing many Americans, especially prime-age men, to simply drop out of the labor force.

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