Pew Research data on trust.

Just half of Americans say they trust all or most of their neighbors, while a similar share say they trust some or none of their neighbors.

Pew Research analyst George Gao looks at data from Pew's American Trends Panel, noting that just 17% of respondents who feel “not at all safe” from crime when walking in their neighborhoods after dark say they trust all or most of their neighbors, compared with 71% of those who feel “very safe.” Gao writes about demographic pattern differences on the issue:

Our survey finds that Americans who can afford to live in more affluent neighborhoods are generally more trusting of their neighbors: 67% of those with household incomes of $75,000 or more say they trust all or most of their neighbors, compared with just 37% of those earning less than $30,000 per year.

But differences in neighborly trust aren’t just associated with economic class. For example, six-in-ten whites (62%) say they trust all or most of their neighbors, compared with 31% of blacks and 27% of Hispanics. While whites as a group are wealthier than blacks and Hispanics, there are still gaps in trust between whites and nonwhites of the same income brackets.

Read more >