Much as it does every weekday afternoon, traffic clogs Highway 101 in San Jose, Calif., during the Monday afternoon rush hour, Oct. 3, 2016. According to the Metropolitan Transportation Commission's  annual report, the stretch from North Fair Oaks Boulevard in Santa Clara to Oakland Road in San Jose is the 4th worst Bay Area congestion. (Karl Mondon/Bay Area News Group)
Karl Mondon Much as it does every weekday afternoon, traffic clogs Highway 101 in San Jose, Calif., during the Monday afternoon rush hour, Oct. 3, 2016. According to the Metropolitan Transportation Commission's annual report, the stretch from North Fair Oaks Boulevard in Santa Clara to Oakland Road in San Jose is the 4th worst Bay Area congestion. (Karl Mondon/Bay Area News Group)

Two new studies from Joint Venture put into perspective how bad housing and commuting in the Bay Area have become in light of the area's growing population fueled by new jobs. Mercury News staffer George Avalos takes a look at how both of these problems have continued to worsen.

Between 2007 and 2016, Santa Clara County, San Mateo County and San Francisco added a combined 344,000 residents but in that time gained only 69,500 units. Center for Continuing Study of the California Economy Director Stephen Levy explains how the Bay Area's housing as not kept pace with population growth:

“Surging job growth has brought many residents back into the workforce, while also resulting in out-of-reach housing costs and growing congestion,” Levy said.

But the employment upswing also has led to more crowded households, Levy said. In 2007, the average household contained 2.65 people. By 2016, that number had risen to 2.77 per household.

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