image via New Geography
image via New Geography

Megacities like New York and Los Angeles are traditionally the most culturally diverse places in the U.S. But as living costs and housing prices continue to hike in big cities, many new immigrants and minority residents have fixed their eye on the suburbs to build an American life. New Geography contributor, Center for Opportunity Urbanism fellow Anne Snyder explores the geography where new immigrants are flocking to. Snyder writes,

"The swell of these “new immigrants” has revived perennial American questions around national identity that ever undergird our migration policy debates. The issues touch almost every region, with suburbs and smaller cities in the country’s interior feeling them most acutely. Where Los Angeles, New York City and Chicago were once the obvious gateways to build an American life, now the cities in the South and West are increasingly attracting the foreign-born. Since 2000, 76 percent of the growth in the immigrant population has occurred in these smaller metropolises, with Pittsburgh, Indianapolis, Oklahoma City and Columbus growing the fastest. A related trend is that as of 2007, four in 10 immigrants now move directly from overseas to the suburbs, eclipsing the urban experience that had always been the landing pad."

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