image via The Atlantic
image via The Atlantic

Going to college, finding a good job, working hard and buying a home have been on the bucket list of several generations for the past decades. But do people still believe that hard-work path nowadays? The Atlantic staffer Lauren Cassani Davis dives into the issue and has some interesting findings. She writes,

"The most recent Allstate/National Journal Heartland Monitor poll asked respondents about the American dream, what it takes to achieve their goals, and whether or not they felt a significant amount of control over their ability to be successful. Overwhelmingly, the results show that today, the idea of the American dream—and what it takes to achieve it—looks quite different than it did in the late 20th century.

By and large, people felt that that their actions and hard work—not outside forces—were the deciding factor in how their lives turned out. But respondents had decidedly mixed feelings about what actions make for a better life in the current economy. For example, most Americans now see personal debt as an obstacle to success. Fifty-seven percent of respondents said that debt encourages people to spend beyond their means, and become burdened with years of interest payments. Unsurprisingly, the only exception were students, the majority of whom still see personal debt as a road to opportunity, since investing in a college degree can result in lower unemployment rates and higher wages. And that’s important, since respondents were split on whether or not incomes would grow faster or slower than they have in the past."

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