The strength of the economy is one of the biggest concerns for America's voters, and is a key factor when picking a political candidate. But with contrasting opinions about how to tackle the nation's wealth, which political party is actually better for the overall economy?

WalletHub's Richie Bernardo investigates years of economic data from 1950 to 2015 during which each party was in control of either the presidency, legislature or both to determine economic performance. The factors range from “real gross domestic product (GDP) growth” to “annual poverty rate change” to “change in annual national debt as a percentage of GDP.”

The analysis determined that overall, the economy has performed best under the combination of a Democratic presidency and Republican Congress. Home values fared best when there was a Democratic president and a divided Congress.

Here are some other highlights:

  • In the past 66 years, real GDP has grown fastest under Democratic control of both the executive and legislative branches of government, at an average of 4.21 percent per year, and most slowly under a Democratic presidency and divided Congress, at an average of 1.97 percent per year.
  • The stock market has performed best under a Democratic presidency and Republican Congress, with the S&P 500 producing an average annual return of 17.03 percent, and worst under a Republican presidency and divided Congress, with an average annual return of 3.28 percent.
  • The annual unemployment rate change has had the highest decrease (0.85 percent, on average) under a Democratic presidency and divided Congress and the highest increase (0.26 percent, on average) under a Republican presidency and Democratic Congress.
  • The annual poverty rate change has had the highest decrease (0.64 percent, on average) under Democratic presidency and Republican Congress and the highest increase (0.18 percent, on average) under a Republican presidency and divided Congress.
  • The change in annual national debt as a percentage of GDP (adjusted for inflation) has had the highest decrease (1.52 percent, on average) under a Democratic presidency and Republican Congress and the highest increase (2.98 percent) under a Democratic presidency and divided Congress.
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