A bent over sign advertising a home for sale is shown in Daly City, California December 31, 2008.  House prices in the area dropped again in October, local media reported on Tuesday. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith  (UNITED STATES) - RTR22YTG
A bent over sign advertising a home for sale is shown in Daly City, California December 31, 2008. House prices in the area dropped again in October, local media reported on Tuesday. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES) - RTR22YTG

Just 20 large urban counties—less than 1% of the nation’s 3,000-plus counties—accounted for half of new business establishments, according to a new report released by the Economic Innovation Group.

CityLab editor-at-large Richard Florida digs into the findings to uncover deepening geographic inequality. He writes:

This skewed distribution of economic advantage is unbelievably striking, even in light of my own long-held argument that America’s economic landscape is increasingly concentrated in large, urbanized centers, which draw in talent and are responsible for the lion’s share of innovative and entrepreneurial activity.

Los Angeles County led the nation, with around 14,500 new establishments, followed by Miami-Dade County in Florida (about 6,800), Kings County, New York, or Brooklyn (6,500), Harris County in Houston (6,000), and Orange County, outside L.A. (4,400).

Read Florida's article to learn more.

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