Photo courtesy: Mark Felix/Associated Press
Photo courtesy: Mark Felix/Associated Press

A new report form the Economic Policy Institute examines the outlook for the Class of 2016 and reveals one-in-six graduates got their diploma and did not work or attend school. Wall Street Journal (subscription required) staffer Josh Zumburn take a look at these graduate who contribute to the idleness rate and how this tracks the overall economic health of the nation.

The number of idled young people also increased during the recessions of 1990-91 and 2001 but improved during the subsequent recoveries. However, the current numbers are above the pre-recession rates and has had different effects on demographics such as men:

This rise of idleness has increasingly afflicted young men. In the most recent recession, their idleness rate soared above 19%. By contrast, in previous recessions, their rate of idleness climbed to about 14%—lower than it is now.

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