Jamyla Bennu mixes product in the basement production facility in her home in Baltimore, Sunday, Jan. 20, 2008. Bennu and her husband spend up to 18 hours a day concocting products aimed largely at black women who've abandoned hair straighteners for their natural locks _ fragile coils easily dried by many store products. (AP Photo/Gail Burton)
Gail Burton Jamyla Bennu mixes product in the basement production facility in her home in Baltimore, Sunday, Jan. 20, 2008. Bennu and her husband spend up to 18 hours a day concocting products aimed largely at black women who've abandoned hair straighteners for their natural locks _ fragile coils easily dried by many store products. (AP Photo/Gail Burton)

CityLab editorial fellow Eillie Anzilotti takes a deep dive into new research that examines the growing number of women-owned businesses grows.

A new report from the Center for an Urban Future details the rates of growth for women-owned businesses between 2007 and 2012 in these cities, and the numbers are impressive. Nationally, the average rate of growth for women-owned businesses hit 27%, but 24 out of the 25 largest cities surpassed that number. Cities averaged a growth rate of 43%; Memphis topped the list with a 116% increase in female-owned firms, writes Anzilotti.

Jonathan Bowles, the executive director of CUF and an author on the report. “The economic landscape is shifting,” he tells CityLab. “At a time when large companies are decentralizing their operations or moving overseas or going to cheaper locales, what’s driving the growth in cities? Small-business entrepreneurs. And many of them are women.”

The data suggest that women-owned businesses could be a major source of new jobs if cities step in to help.

Read more about the report's findings and why they are important.

Read more >