Photo courtesy Lotzman Katzman
Photo courtesy Lotzman Katzman

While the cities of the Midwest were once filled with industrial leaders; now these cities are losing are losing residents. CityLab staffer Alexia Fernandez Campbell spoke with Galen Newman, an assistant professor of landscape architecture and urban planning at Texas A&M, about smart decline - a way that cities can plan around population loss and find ways to manage it.

Smart decline is not highly accepted as these once highly successful cities struggle to accept that they may not grow fast economically:

Well, many of these cities, especially in the Midwest, in the '60s, '70s, they were kind of in their heyday. So, they were growing, their population was growing, their industry was growing, their economies were growing because of all that. And once they begin to de-industrialize, the fallout began Once you've been to the top, it's kind of tough to accept...a lower state than what you're used to.

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