Best Foot Forward. A stuccoed entrance is one of the sleeker design flourishes that Century Communities is showcasing with its new models at the sustainable community of Candelas in Arvada, Colo.
Courtesy of Century Communities Best Foot Forward. A stuccoed entrance is one of the sleeker design flourishes that Century Communities is showcasing with its new models at the sustainable community of Candelas in Arvada, Colo.

Century Communities “made it” through the housing recession, says director of marketing Mike Davidson, by focusing primarily on building attached products.

Recently, however, the Greenwood Village, Colo.–based company has gotten back into building single-family homes again at several of its dozen neighborhoods, such as Monecito at RidgeGate in Lone Tree, Colo., which opened last December and where Century’s homes start in the low $500s; and Bradburn Village near Broomfield, Colo., where the home prices start in the low $300s.

Earlier this month, Century began selling homes at Candelas, a sustainable master-planned community in Arvada, Colo., one of the state’s big job centers near Golden and Boulder but still only 30 minutes from Denver. The developer, Terra Causa Capital (which is in partnership with GF Properties, a subsidiary of the Southern Ute Indian Tribe), allocated 127 lots for Century, whose homes will compete in this community with products from Ryland Homes, Richmond American, and Standard Pacific.

Davidson expects his company will eventually have a bigger presence at Candelas, where a total of 1,500 homes are planned.

Candelas’ tagline is “Live Forward,” and the community places considerable emphasis on energy efficiency. Its rec centers are LEED certified and all of its homes must be Energy Star certified and solar ready; in fact the majority of the homes built there so far come with solar panels as standard features. The community also maintains a sustainability trust, which allocates funding for the potential retrofitting of every new home lot that is not built originally with a renewable energy system.

Under these competitive efficiency prescriptions, Century, says Davidson, felt that it needed to come up with home designs that were “fresh” and “modern.” Its architect, Denver-based Godden Sudik, developed models with open interior architectures, and sleeker exteriors that feature dramatic stucco-finished front entrances.

The models range from 1,900 to 3,200 square feet and are priced from $354,950 to $414,950.

“[Century was] looking for something different for an area that’s a bit more progressive-leaning” in terms of what first-time and move-up home buyers want, says Paul Brady, a partner at Godden Sudik.

The architect also decided to go with hipped roofs so the homes could accommodate a solar energy package that Century offers (in conjunction with SolarCity) that includes a 20-year prepaid leased system with 1.92-kilowatt upgrades available.

John Caulfield is senior editor for Builder magazine.

Learn more about markets featured in this article: Denver, CO.