CalTrain speeds across rush hour traffic on Interstate 280 Wednesday evening, Feb. 10, 2016, into downtown San Jose, Calif. (Karl Mondon/Bay Area News Group)
Karl Mondon CalTrain speeds across rush hour traffic on Interstate 280 Wednesday evening, Feb. 10, 2016, into downtown San Jose, Calif. (Karl Mondon/Bay Area News Group)

The San Francisco Bay Area's boundaries have been expanding into nearby counties as skyrocketing housing prices push residents farther from jobs in Silicon Valley and San Francisco.

This has resulted in longer commutes and increasing pressure on roads and rails, reports Erin Baldassari of the Bay Area News Group, who digs into a revealing new report released by the Bay Area Council, a business-sponsored public policy advocate. She writes:

The Northern San Joaquin Valley area is leading the region in the number of workers it is sending to Bay Area companies. Between 1990 and 2013, the number of people commuting from the valley to job centers in the Bay Area more than doubled, growing around 32,000 commuters to nearly 65,000, according to the report.

"Silicon Valley really likes our labor force, but our labor force really doesn't like the Silicon Valley's housing costs," said Mike Ammann, president and CEO of San Joaquin Partnership, a nonprofit economic development corporation.

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