File - In this Jan. 5, 2016 file photo, rain drops bead on a car window below the Golden Gate Bridge in Sausalito, Calif. Nearly a dozen days of rain have doused Northern California this month and more soakings are in store before February rolls around, while Southern California more or less has gotten short-shrift from the El Nino-backed storms, forecasters said Thursday, Jan. 21. The storms aren't yet enough to end California's four-year dry spell. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
Eric Risberg File - In this Jan. 5, 2016 file photo, rain drops bead on a car window below the Golden Gate Bridge in Sausalito, Calif. Nearly a dozen days of rain have doused Northern California this month and more soakings are in store before February rolls around, while Southern California more or less has gotten short-shrift from the El Nino-backed storms, forecasters said Thursday, Jan. 21. The storms aren't yet enough to end California's four-year dry spell. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)

Tech is not the sole cause of the housing crisis in San Francisco, according to CityLab staffer Kriston Capps, who asserts that other factors are at play including a lack of housing caused by wealthier homeowners. Capps examines the issue through the lens of a response to a New York Times story on the housing shortage from Gawker’s Hamilton Nolan, who wrote what Capps calls a wake-up call for San Francisco.

Capps points out that Nolan's assertion that new things can be built "in other places" is part of the problem:

Since the residents of high-cost, high-demand neighborhoods tend to have mobility, money, and access to information and power, they are hugely successful in leveraging land-use policies to exclude newcomers. They protect what is theirs and shut the gate behind them. (Nolan gets that.) So the high-margin development that really should go into the high-end neighborhood winds up replacing cheaper, older, and abandoned housing in low-end neighborhoods.

Read more >