The Internal Revenue Service has released its estimates of residential movement based on exemptions on tax returns.

The Internal Revenue Service has released its estimates of residential movement between counties and states for 2013 to 2014, based on claimed exemptions on tax returns. (Not everyone is covered by this sampling method, but the IRS estimates that it covers approximately 80% of the population.)

According to these estimates, net domestic migration, or movement into a particular state, was by far the greatest in Texas and Florida. Texas saw a net migration of 229,300, twice that of Florida. The states’ positions have been constant throughout most of the 21st century, except briefly during the housing-crash period when Florida’s numbers dropped.

New York saw the greatest domestic loss, with 126,000 fewer residents.

Much of the net domestic migration data has remained constant from 2000 to 2013 (no data for 2010) and 2013 to 2014. Nine of the top ten net domestic gainers in each time frame appear on both lists. The greatest difference between the two is Florida, which was the top domestic gainer from 2000 to 2013 but now ranks second.

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