Marvin Windows

  • Family Retreat

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    Bradley M. Jones

    Inspired by its natural surroundings, this family escape in the woods of Massachusetts is sided with local stone and cedar shingles interspersed with plenty of oversized windows that allow for a New England farm house feel while maintaining plenty of natural light. Window treatments sport black clad exteriors to complement the natural materials and standing seam metal roof. Inside, window casements are done in Douglas fir to match exposed beams and millwork. Project: Family Retreat, Tyringham, Mass.; Architect: Solomon+Bauer+Giambastiani Architects, Watertown, Mass.

  • Family Retreat

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    Bradley M. Jones

  • Family Retreat

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    Bradley M. Jones

  • Block Island House

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    Warren Jagger

    Drawing on traditional Block Island forms, this home incorporates two blocks connected by an expanded shed porch. Large expanses of glass and windows allow nearly every room to take advantage of south-facing views. Project: Block Island House, Block Island, R.I.; Architect: Estes/Twombly Architects, Newport, R.I.

  • Block Island House

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    Warren Jagger

  • Leicester House

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    Daniel Levin

    Carved into a hillside in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, this contemporary home offers expansive views of the rolling countryside. Walls of windows along the south and west façades were assembled in a custom configuration of standard windows, creating a dramatic landscape view while keeping the design economically viable. A rainwater collection system harvests 80% of the water that falls on the roof for reuse in toilets and landscaping. Project: Leicester House, Asheville, N.C.; Architect: SPC Architects, N.Y.

  • Leicester House

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    Daniel Levin

  • Leicester House

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    Daniel Levin

  • Neoclassical Residence

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    Pete Weigley

    An update and addition to this 1895 Neoclassical home stayed true to the original form thanks to thoughtful historical detailing. Project: Neoclassical Residence, Princeton, N.J.; Architect: Knight Architects, Princeton

  • Neoclassical Residence

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    Pete Weigley

  • Neoclassical Residence

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    Pete Weigley

  • Utah Street Residence

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    Steve Maxwell

    To make room for a new kitchen and entertainment space, this home’s existing kitchen and dining room were combined and given a new addition in a design that makes use of 11-foot ceilings with clerestory windows atop large picture windows that invite the landscape in. Project: Utah Street Residence, Arlington, Va.; Architect: Jon Hensley Architects, Arlington

  • Utah Street Residence

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    Steve Maxwell

  • Tynte Park

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    Paul Sherwood

    Once a school and private chapel, this 200-year-old estate now serves as a historic residence, thanks to a renovation and addition carefully crafted to match the original stone-faced structures. Plenty of windows frame views of surrounding gardens, cornfields, and beech woods. Project: Tynte Park Lodge, County Wicklow, Ireland; Architect: The Priory, Dublin, Ireland

  • Tynte Park

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    Paul Sherwood

  • Tynte Park

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    Paul Sherwood

  • North Woods Lake Home

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    Pete Sieger

    This Minnesota lake home’s exterior offers an update of traditional farm house forms. However, once inside, the floor plan opens wide to allow for sweeping lake views, breezes, and modern living. Oversized double-hung windows help to bridge the gap between old and new styles, mimicking large picture windows while maintaining the exterior’s historic aesthetic. Project: North Woods Lake Home, Grand Rapids, Minn.; Architect: Albertsson Hansen Architecture, Minneapolis

  • North Woods Lake Home

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    Pete Sieger

Windows have a lot riding on them. Beyond their basic function of bringing in natural light and views, today’s windows must have both beauty and brains—able to complement a home’s architectural style, boost its energy efficiency, and protect it against the fiercest weather.

It’s a lot to worry about, but when done well, there are few things that have a greater impact on a home’s comfort and style.

To help promote excellence in all these areas, Marvin Windows conducts its annual myMarvin Architect’s Challenge, which celebrates "solution-driven design, classical beauty, innovative use of windows, and sustainability," the company says. This year’s winners run the gamut from a historic Neoclassical to a cutting-edge contemporary to a 200-year-old chapel converted into a charming residence.

Whatever your project, these beauties—selected from among the contest’s nine winners—offer ideas of all kinds.

Claire Easley is a senior editor at Builder.