2012 AIA Virginia Awards of Excellence - Residential Winners

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    Maxwell MacKenzie

    Architecture Category – Award of Honor Wissioming Residence, Glen Echo, Md. Architect: Robert M. Gurney, FAIA, Architect with Brian Tuskey; Builder: Bloom Builders

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    Maxwell MacKenzie

    Jury comments: It is an elegant modern home that creates a place in the woods. It is comfortable with its skin with and elegant in its proportions and composition. Light and space flows through the plan. The relationship between the inside and outside of the wooded site is explored to great advantage.

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    Maxwell MacKenzie

    Great material palette for its setting, numerous energy savings and constructing efficiency initiatives are combined with admirable design clarity and distinctiveness.

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    Maxwell MacKenzie

    The entry court is well-considered outdoor room which provides a nice a sense of arrival to the compound.

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    Maxwell MacKenzie

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    2000

    Maxwell MacKenzie

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    Alan Karchmer

    Residential Design Category - Award of Honor Restoration/Renovation of an Addition to a 1930s Residence, Washington, D.C. Architect: Muse Architects; Builder: Horizon Builders Jury comments: Often a historic restoration is just that--a restoration of what was there before. This addition and restoration actually enhances the original by being respectful, but also modern. And an important part of being modern is implementing substantial energy efficiency and sustainable design measures. The submission provided a good road map for what the client wanted to achieve and how the design responded to it.

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    Alan Karchmer

    This is a beautifully conceived and crafted addition and renovation which brought new life into an aging house. In some ways, such care and attention is the cornerstone of sustainability: well-loved buildings will have long, adaptable lives.

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    Alan Karchmer

    The difficulty of operating within the constraints of a very strong design framework was overcome with the creation of an interior courtyard, glass wall, and garden terrace that echoed period design without being overly heavy-handed.

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    Alan Karchmer

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    Prakash Patel

    Residential Design Category - Award of Honor Dogtrot at Stony Point, Charlottesville, Va. Architect: Hays + Ewing Design Studio; Builder: Peter Johnson Builders

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    Prakash Patel

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    Prakash Patel

    This home was most successful in creating a sense of connectivity to nature with use of the battered wood wall that opens into usable outdoor space, very livable. This is a project that will take on a different character in different seasons, and I think will only get even better with age.

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    Prakash Patel

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    Prakash Patel

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    2000

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    Maxwell MacKenzie

    Residential Design Category - Award of Honor Janelia Farm Apartments, Ashburn, Va. WDG Architecture

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    Maxwell MacKenzie

    Jury comments: The mix of materials worked to create a sense of modernity as well as connection to the environment, with the stone wall and textured metal walls recalling the farmhouse/wood barn structures which historically inhabited that area.

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    Maxwell MacKenzie

    This design very nicely humanizes the scale of a very large project, both in plan with the use of the smaller pods with individual entrances and community rooms, and in elevation through the articulation of windows and balconies. These moves provoke a more personal connection with the building and encourage community building, which may in turn foster a more socially sustainable place.

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    Maxwell MacKenzie

    The use of materials is especially effective throughout this project, both on the exterior and the interior, in public spaces as well as individual units. What could have been a very institutional building that interrupts the landscape, instead feels like a hub of activity that complements it surroundings.

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    Maxwell MacKenzie

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    Maxwell MacKenzie

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    Maxwell MacKenzie

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    Ward Bucher

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    Ward Bucher

    Jury Comments: The restoration and addition were true to [the building’s] original character. Restoration was consistent with Secretary of Interior Standards for Historic Restoration. The addition was respectful yet distinctive of the original. Good cultural reuse of a vacant building.

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    Ward Bucher

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    Ward Bucher

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    Ward Bucher

Three custom houses, campus apartments for medical researchers, and one cool barbecue pavilion may not seem to have a lot in common. These four projects, however, share two things—they all were designed with consideration to gorgeous sites, and they all won a 2012 Virginia AIA Award for Excellence. Three of the projects were selected in the residential design category, which was added as a separate category for the first time. The fourth winning house was awarded in the general architecture category. In addition to the residential winners, a Georgian-style mansion originally designed in 1924 by architect George Oakley Totten Jr. was saved, restored, and transformed into a multicultural center—which earned it an award for historic preservation.

A total of 19 projects were selected for honors. The jurors were divided into separate groups based on categories. The residential jury included Casius Pealer, Assoc. AIA, Tulane School of Architecture, New Orleans; Lisa Hodges, Oystertree Consulting, Baltimore; and Jody McGuire, Studio 8, New Haven, Conn. The architecture jurors were Joseph Bilello, FAIA, Ball State College of Architecture and Planning; Bruce Race, FAIA, RACESTUDIO, Berkeley, Calif.; and Steve Alspaugh, AIA, Schmidt Associates, Indianapolis. The three jurors for the historic preservation category included Ronald Battaglia, FAIA, and Peter Flynn, AIA, Flynn Battaglia Architects, Buffalo, N.Y.; and Barbara Campagna, FAIA, Barbara A. Campagna/Architecture + Planning, Buffalo.

The residential category jurors commented that they would have liked to see more affordable and mixed-income housing projects, but were impressed with the overall quality of submissions. “Based on the submissions for this year's residential awards program,” they said, “it seems that what's going on in Virginia now includes a preservation of the past, as well as new houses that are yearning to connect with nature and save on energy use.”

All of the winners will be recognized at the Vision for Architecture Gala on Nov. 9. Photographs, models, and plans detailing the projects will be on display at the Virginia Center for Architecture from Oct. 25 to Jan. 6.

Read more about the winning residential projects in the accompanying slideshow.