New homes with traditional styling sell well when attention is paid to nailing the exterior details, even with smartly chosen, off-the-shelf products.
Courtesy Crasi Co. New homes with traditional styling sell well when attention is paid to nailing the exterior details, even with smartly chosen, off-the-shelf products.

With the resurgence of traditional neighborhood developments, there’s talk about architecture that doesn’t just look good, but that looks correct. Craftsman, Queen Anne, Shingle style: Buyers are more interested than ever in these classic designs, and they expect you to know the difference. Designing to correct specifications sounds expensive, but it doesn’t have to be. It can be done by using the right materials in proper scale. Details that are born of good intention but look wrong are a pitfall that’s easy to succumb to—everyone wants to make their product stand out. But with traditional-style houses, flourishes that attempt to make a house distinctive can be a costly mistake. This is where being a stickler for detail and proportion can save you money as the result will be a home that stands out because it looks great.

Off-the-shelf columns, shutters, and surrounds that are right-sized don’t cost more than those with out-of-whack proportions. Added attentiveness during the initial design phase helps get it right. One easy way to get up to speed on architectural styles is by consulting books. This sounds obvious, but references are a great way to help you get the details right.

Buyers might not have the know-how to tell you that the baluster spacing is off or that the shutters look skimpy. But homes with the perfect elements in place pull an emotional response from the buyer because houses that look right feel right. And ultimately, houses that feel right are houses that sell well.