Design Details: Doors

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    Maxwell MacKenzie

    A vertical window extends this home’s entryway, allowing the door to act as a piece of the façade’s play on geometric cutouts. Project: Hampton Lane House, Bethesda, Md.; Architect: Robert M. Gurney, Washington, D.C.; Builder: Freedom First Homes, Bethesda, Md.

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    Jim Bartsch

    Torn between her desire for rich color and her want  to maintain the modern home’s neutral palette, this home’s owner found a clever way to have the best of both  by adding splashes of color inside the laundry room and on closet doors.
    Project: Private residence, Venice, Calif.; Architects: Abramson Teiger Architects
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    Jim Bartsch

    Matching translucent doors create a sense of privacy and transition between the street and this home, without being unwelcoming. Project: Private residence, Venice, Calif.; Architects: Abramson Teiger Architects

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    Bill Timmerman

    Inexpensive steel studs mounted onto metal apertures offer a high-end custom look at low cost -- a durable option for areas facing extreme heat. Project: Private Residence, Tucson, Ariz.; Architect: Ibarra Rosano, Tucson.

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    James F. Wilson

    Sliding doors set at a 90-degree angle offer an updated take on the traditional French door style enclosure, without sacrificing the ability to open the space up to the rest of the home. Project: Builder 2012 Concept Home, Orlando, Fla.; Architects: Canin Associates, Orlando; Woodley Architectural Group, Denver; Builder: Centerline Homes, Coral Springs, Fla.

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    Daniel O'Connor

    This sliding barn-door entry, made of slats of Western Cedar, provides privacy and access to street views and sunlight. Project: Cragmoor Residence, Boulder, Colo.; Architect: Arch11, Boulder; Builder: Buckner Construction, Boulder

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    Emily Minton Redfield

    A curved front door echoed by an undulating awning offer a pitch-perfect welcome to this cozy mountain cottage. Project: Mountain Cottage, Denver area; Architect: TKP Architects, Golden, Colo.

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    Matthew Carbone

    Red punches up this sliding barn-style door. The bright hue adds interest while staying in character with the home’s Midwestern farm house aesthetic. Project: Woodland Hall House, Columbus, Ohio; Architect: Meyers + Associates, Columbus; Builder: Ghiloni Custom Builders, Granville, Ohio

It's spring selling season, which makes us think of spiffing things up to ensure a  good first impression. Often the first point of contact with a home, a door offers that initial opportunity to beckon a potential buyer inside. And because they require physical interaction, doors allow builders to demonstrate the quality of the product. (Nothing can make a home feel flimsy faster than a shoddy door, while a hefty one says "quality." 

We’ve collected some of our favorite front doors, back doors, and doors in between—all of which offer a unique entry. So come on in; the possibilities are wide open.

Claire Easley is a senior editor at Builder.