TO INCORPORATE THE architectural language of Oakland's gentrifying Jack London Square, you have to speak factory. Take, as evidence, this project's neighbors, which include railroad tracks, a paper company, and a restaurant supply warehouse. The six-story, mixed-use development demonstrates its fluency with floor-to-ceiling, garage-style windows and cast-in-place concrete walls. With “the detailing in the concrete forms, the fluting was all we did to dress it up,” says architect Stan Braden.

The amenities—fitness center, bocce ball court—and the loft-style units themselves are all up to date. Two lower stories house a parking garage and retail space. Above, the building becomes L-shaped, opening to a south-facing common area.

The designers didn't forget that some residents would have those adjacent railroad tracks to contend with. Units on that side of the building are outfitted with triple-glazed windows, an extra layer of protection to help screen out the sound of trains passing in the night.

BD061001160L1.jpgCLICK HERE FOR IMAGE GALLERY
BD061001160L1.jpgCLICK HERE FOR IMAGE GALLERY

BD061001160L1.jpgCLICK HERE FOR IMAGE GALLERY
BD061001160L1.jpgCLICK HERE FOR IMAGE GALLERY

Category: Mixed-use community; Entrant/Architect: KTGY Group, Irvine, Calif.; Builder: Webcor, Hayward, Calif.; Developer: The Embarcadero Pacific Co., San Francisco; Landscape architect: April Phillips Design Works, Sausalito, Calif.; Interior designer: Decors, Belevedere, Calif.

Learn more about markets featured in this article: San Francisco, CA.