The winners of the 2014 Marvin Awards from left to right: Jed Gibson, President, Toll Architecture Horsham, Pa.; Jonathan Segal, Founder, Jonathan Segal Architecture and Development San Diego; Ron Harwick, Vice president, JHP Architecture/Urban Design Dallas
Colin Lenton; Austin Hargrave; and Trevor Paulhus The winners of the 2014 Marvin Awards from left to right: Jed Gibson, President, Toll Architecture Horsham, Pa.; Jonathan Segal, Founder, Jonathan Segal Architecture and Development San Diego; Ron Harwick, Vice president, JHP Architecture/Urban Design Dallas

From innovative placemaking and stunning multifamily projects to trend-setting design in production housing, this year’s inductees into BUILDER’s Wm. S. Marvin Hall of Fame for Design Excellence—architects Jed Gibson, Jonathan Segal, and Ron Harwick—have spent their careers crafting lively, livable housing that responds to consumer needs.

THE BIG BUILDER
Jed Gibson
The president of Toll Brothers’ architecture group started at Toll in 1993, when he was brought on to pilot an inside team of drafters. As Toll’s business evolved geographically, new product lines and community characteristics took on more of the nation’s regional nuances, and Gibson’s design chops broadened to encompass new lines as the firm’s offerings for its affluent customer base expanded.

Toll and a single-family architecture distinction may be a surprise to some, but under Gibson’s watch, Toll Brothers at Amalfi Hills—Positano Collection won Project of the Year at the NAHB Nationals. In an effort to join the ranks of global luxury brands, Toll now features the work of “starchitects” like Pritzker Prize-winner Christian de Portzamparc for Manhattan’s 400 Park Avenue South and Rogers Marvel Architects (now defunct) for Pierhouse at Brooklyn Bridge Park.

THE PLACEMAKER
Jonathan Segal The San Diego-based developer has crafted a unique practice free of clients, lenders, and city officials that gives him the ability to design when, where, and what he wants. For each of his projects—built on spec in urban infill communities—Segal acts as developer, general contractor, interior designer, and property manager. Funds come from his company and the sites he builds are small enough that they don’t require community approval. “There’s a real distinction between what an architect thinks should happen and what a developer and a banker think should happen,” he says. “They look backward to what’s worked in the past, and an architect looks forward.”

Segal’s firm, considered one of the most successful and pioneering residential architectural/development companies in San Diego, is known for producing cutting-edge multifamily housing at costs that are up to  20 percent less than projects built using a standard developer/architect/builder model.

THE TRENDSETTER
Ron Harwick As co-founder of Dallas-based JHP Architecture/Urban Design, Harwick designs multifamily rental projects that resonate with tenants of all ages and economic backgrounds. His award-winning work spans urban mixed use, transit-oriented development, active adult communities, and affordable housing. His popular micro units in Fort Worth, Texas, and Charleston, S.C., were created out of a need to squeeze more density into sites of 1 acre or less. Maxing out at 750 square feet, they are in demand with young professionals who don’t want to forgo urban living. 

With his firm surpassing 900,000 completed units, Harwick is happy to say he’s bullish on the rental market. “It’s going to be strong the next 10 to 15 years because of a lot of factors, including the student loan situation and the fact that people want to be more mobile,” he says. “They don’t want to be committed to one area, they want to be able to pick up and move and not worry about carrying a mortgage.”